RAW MILK and Beyond

Raw Milk...the Gut Biome Builder like No Other Food on Earth

Food For the Gut. Food For Thought.

“We are bacterio-sapiens,” Mark McAfee speaks in a powerful Live Aware presentation on the interesting perspective on raw milk and the Earth’s biome. Raw milk is an essential food to the human diet, but why? Organic Pastures’ raw dairy products are simply that- products made from milk that is unprocessed, whole, and living, with all of its probiotic bacteria. NEVER pasteurized (heated), homogenized (crushed), or otherwise altered. We produce delicious world-class dairy products for you to enjoy. 

Organic Pastures Whole Raw Milk is unprocessed and complete with bioavailable vitamins, minerals, enzymes, beneficial bacteria, naturally occurring CLA and Omega-3 fatty acids.  The ease of digestibility of Whole Raw Milk gives those that experience discomfort with processed dairy products, a delicious and natural option. Our truly happy, organic cows grass graze on lush certified organic green pasture, all year long. Simply filtered, chilled, tested, and bottled; nothing added or taken away. 100% ORGANIC. Absolutely NO antibiotics, synthetic hormones, toxic pesticides or GMO anything.

What is Biome?

A  biome   /ˈbaɪoʊm/  is a community of plants and animals that have common characteristics for the environment they exist in. They can be found over a range of continents. Biomes are distinct biological communities that have formed in response to a shared physical climate. [1]  [2]  "Biome" is a broader term than " habitat "; any biome can comprise a variety of habitats.  While a biome can cover large areas, a microbiome is a mix of organisms that coexist in a defined space on a much smaller scale. For example, the  human microbiome  is the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present on or in a human body. [3]   A 'biota' is the total collection of organisms of a geographic region or a time period, from local geographic scales and instantaneous temporal scales all the way up to whole-planet and whole-timescale spatiotemporal scales. The biotas of the Earth make up the  biosphere .

A biome /ˈbaɪoʊm/ is a community of plants and animals that have common characteristics for the environment they exist in. They can be found over a range of continents. Biomes are distinct biological communities that have formed in response to a shared physical climate.[1][2] "Biome" is a broader term than "habitat"; any biome can comprise a variety of habitats.

While a biome can cover large areas, a microbiome is a mix of organisms that coexist in a defined space on a much smaller scale. For example, the human microbiome is the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present on or in a human body.[3]

A 'biota' is the total collection of organisms of a geographic region or a time period, from local geographic scales and instantaneous temporal scales all the way up to whole-planet and whole-timescale spatiotemporal scales. The biotas of the Earth make up the biosphere.

Why Your Gut Biome has Changed and Why Probiotics Have Become So Important

“The human gut biome (microbiome) consists of about 100 trillion bacteria cells — more than 10 times more than there are human cells in your body. You could even start to think of your gut biome as a significant organ in your body, so keeping it healthy and balanced is essential to reduce disease and optimize performance. As we learn more about the makeup of good and bad bacteria in the gut biome, researchers are also doing cutting edge DNA microbiome sequencing to show how people’s gut biomes are changing on a population level.

Gut biomes are becoming imbalanced because there are less good bacteria and more bad bacteria available in modern lifestyles and the standard American diet. When microbiota balance is out of whack, your body develops chronic inflammation, which can become autoimmune disease or other serious health problems. New research even suggests that diabetes may be an autoimmune disease triggered by poor gut health.[1]

Aside from antibiotics overuse, poor diets and environmental toxins also wreak havoc on the gut by wearing down the protective barriers of the intestinal walls, eventually creating a leaky gut. As I’ve written previously, foods that are heavily processed, preserved, and filled with chemicals and toxins, damage gut health. Common types of these gut-damaging foods include: gluten, processed meats, sugar, most alcohol, mold toxins from coffee and chocolate, and more. These foods increase histamine levels, which in part is due to bad bacteria. I will go into more detail about histamine inducing bacteria in foods later in this post.

One of the reasons I’m such a fan of fresh, organic, local meat and vegetables is that our gut bacteria ultimately are related to our soil bacteria. Soil bacteria are the microbiome of the planet. Industrial agriculture has permanently modified soil organisms — molds and bacteria — so that they produce more toxins than ever before in history. The genes that form those toxins get shared with the bacteria growing in your gut.

Since the advent of antibiotics, scientists have been all over fighting bad bacteria. Now they are beginning to understand the importance of good bacteria and microorganisms in our guts. This “good bacteria” theory led to taking supplemental probiotics as the go-to way to help re-populate our guts after courses of antibiotics or other stressors. Although some probiotics are good for you, sadly (for yogurt companies especially), most manufactured probiotics are only minimally effective at re-populating the gut biome. It is becoming apparent that not all strains of probiotics interact with the gut in the same way.”- Mission.org (website quote)

Kaleigh LutzComment